Saturday, July 6, 2013

Using Google Apps in your Classroom


Based on a suggestion from one of the participants at HOSA 2013, we've decided to spend a day brainstorming all the different ways you can use Google's free applications in your classroom. Any of the apps below can be used on any computer with your free gmail account. If you or one of your students does not have a gmail account, create one at https://accounts.google.com/SignUp.


Unfortunately most google apps do require  Firefox or Chrome (which are both free browsers) and may not run properly on Internet Explorer. 

Google Drive: 
Share a Google Document with your students

 Google Drive is like a virtual desk top or file cabinet. You can upload any documents you'd like and even edit/create documents right through your internet browser. If you do create a document or upload a document to Google Drive, you can share it with any other gmail users (which is great for sharing syllabi, study sheets or assignments with your students!).





Creating Forms in Google Drive:
Adding a Form to Google Drive

One of the documents you can create in Google Drive is a form, which can also be used as a take home assessment or assignment. Within a form, you'll be able to create as many Questions as you'd like and decide how students can answer those questions (multiple choice, free form text, etc.). Then, share the form with your students. When they answer the form and submit the answers, you'll be able to view each submitted form and also pull a compilation of all answers for grading/assessment.






Google Hangouts:
Using Google Hangouts for Study Groups
Have a big test your students are preparing for? Possible finals? Or the NCLEX? Fear not, you can provide extra study help or encourage students to create study groups outside of the classroom. Google Hangouts is a way for multiple gmail users to "hangout" using video or text chat and voice (just like a phone call!).  That way, a group of students can all share a screen and study together no matter how far away they may be located from one another. The great thing about this is students can also share their screens with one another so they can look at the same materials all at once.



That's just a quick look at how Google Apps may be useful for your classroom, but keep your eyes open for even more tutorials and detailed information. We'll be writing more after we have just a little longer to consider all the creative uses.

Does anyone else use Google Apps in their classroom now?