Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Lecture Ideas with an EHR: Hygiene

We often talk about how an EHR system can be used in the classroom as well as in the Simulation Lab or after clinical rotations. However, we realized we rarely post ideas for how to do so on this blog. Sure, we've mentioned it in passing in relation to EMS/EMT programs, Vaccines, Nutrition and our recently added Polling Feature, but we've decided to do a few posts specifically with classroom and lecture ideas.

For a topic that all CNA, LPN and prelicensure RN students will have to cover, we thought we'd discuss hygiene and daily care as our first post.
  • Pull up a chart for a stroke patient and post it on your projector or smartboard. 
  • Either during a discussion of strokes or a discussion of hygiene, create a critical thinking scenario by asking pointed questions about patient care for the chart being displayed on your projector or smartboard.
    • What do we need to do for this patient's daily care? (Answers should include any bathing, ambulating, sheet changing, etc. required for the patient) 
    • As far as bathing, what type of bath should be given to this patient? (You can review the orders on the projector to see if there is an order for a type of bath -- instructors can always add or edit orders beforehand if you'd like a specific order to show up here -- if there is no order, students can discuss accordingly). 
    • If bathing or ambulating is required ask, what are some risk factors we need to take into account? (Hopefully students will ask to review the past assessments of the patient to see if the patient is having weakness on either side. Of course, that would change any ambulating or bathing procedures).
  • Throughout the activity, make sure to encourage students to discuss any concerns they have or ask to see more aspects of the chart throughout. If you have the technology available, students can also follow along on their computer, tablet or smartphone. 
As you can see, this is nothing but a quick discussion during/after a lecture. However, it gives students a chance to incorporate critical thinking skills into the lesson. They should already know the ramifications of a stroke and they should understand the mechanics of hygiene and daily care. But do they know how it all ties together? What are important factors when caring for a real patient? These are all things we can practice with our students in the classroom before they have to do all the thinking without a guide. Now is the time to establish those good habits while you're still there to help them along the way.